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CSE/ISE/IT Seminar Topics

3D-Doctor

Google Chrome Laptop

XBOX 360 System

iSphere

Teradata

zForce Touch Screen

Wireless Body Area Network

E-Ball Technology

Apache Cassandra

Symbian Mobile Operating System

Multiple Access Control Protocol

Digital Preservation

Smart Skin for Machine Handling

Bio-Molecular Computing

64-Bit Computing

Worldwide Inter operatibility for Microwave Access

MANET

Conditional Access System

Aeronautical Communication

Digital Audio Broadcasting

Significance of real-time transport Protocol

Radio Network Controller

Space Mouse

Image Processing and Compression Technique

Transient Stability Assessment

Tracking and Positioning of Mobiles

Space Mouse

Every day of your computing life, you reach out for the mouse whenever you want to move the cursor or activate something. The mouse senses your motion and your clicks and sends them to the computer so it can respond appropriately. An ordinary mouse detects motion in the X and Y plane and acts as a two dimensional controller. It is not well suited for people to use in a 3D graphics environment.

Space Mouse is a professional 3D controller specifically designed for manipulating objects in a 3D environment. It permits the simultaneous control of all six degrees of freedom - translation rotation or a combination. . The device serves as an intuitive man-machine interface

The predecessor of the spacemouse was the DLR controller ball. Spacemouse has its origins in the late seventies when the DLR (German Aerospace Research Establishment) started research in its robotics and system dynamics division on devices with six degrees of freedom (6 dof) for controlling robot grippers in Cartesian space. The basic principle behind its construction is mechatronics engineering and the multisensory concept. The spacemouse has different modes of operation in which it can also be used as a two-dimensional mouse.

How does computer mouse work?
Mice first broke onto the public stage with the introduction of the Apple Macintosh in 1984, and since then they have helped to completely redefine the way we use computers. Every day of your computing life, you reach out for your mouse whenever you want to move your cursor or activate something. Your mouse senses your motion and your clicks and sends them to the computer so it can respond appropriately

Inside a Mouse
The main goal of any mouse is to translate the motion of your hand into signals that the computer can use. Almost all mice today do the translation using five components: